Balkancam Frauen kennenlernen mallorca

Manitoba would need nothing; it had given magnificently. Moneys have poured into the treasury of the Fund until the total contributions have reached and exceeded ,000,000. Colonel Ryerson urged (1) that supplies should be sent through the recog- nized channel of the Society, and (2) that more motor-ambulance should be contributed. 18,734.00 Quebec 78,886.45 New Brunswick 17,307.65 Saskatchewan 72,606 . 24 British Columbia 54,596.63 Alberta 40,729.88 Total

Manitoba would need nothing; it had given magnificently. Moneys have poured into the treasury of the Fund until the total contributions have reached and exceeded $6,000,000. Colonel Ryerson urged (1) that supplies should be sent through the recog- nized channel of the Society, and (2) that more motor-ambulance should be contributed. 18,734.00 Quebec 78,886.45 New Brunswick 17,307.65 Saskatchewan 72,606 . 24 British Columbia 54,596.63 Alberta 40,729.88 Total $1,106,273.63 The City of Montreal undertook a special campaign and col- lected $100,000. As time passed on the German set- tlers seemed to accept the situation, generally, despite the pes- simistic view of F. German Clubs were allowed in various cities to be centres of enemy talk, if nothing worse, and it was not until rumours of rejoicings as to the Lusitania got abroad that those of Toronto, Montreal and Hamilton were closed. British Columbia had been hard hit financially and would require $600,000 of which it could raise $400,000. Though anticipating a generous response I was hardly prepared for the magnificent manner in which the call was met. A meeting was held and Committees appointed with H. The Royal North- West Mounted Police, however, were omniprescient in the West; their energy, large powers, and known courage, prevented trouble even where a few isolated communities might have desired to create it; the disarming and registration policy for alien enemies helped to prevent any serious issue. Born at Dresden, Germany, and educated at 364 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW Gottingen, he had lived in Canada since 1873 and been naturalized in or about 1896; he denied the statements absolutely but at once dropped out of various positions such as the Directorate of the Bank of Montreal and of the St. Canadian tolerance of things German during this year gradually lessened but for the first six months of the War it was akin to that of England herself. In the first 17 months of war the largest contribution sent to the Fund by any one city was that of Montreal with $1,484,341— excluding the C. Winnipeg gave generously ($521,043) but its Association was an independent one.* A certain number of individual or independent subscriptions went direct to the head office of the Fund as with that of the Law Society of Upper Canada, $10,000; a proportion of the C. Other incidents of 1915 included a con- tribution of $5,000 from Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., of Montreal and other cities ; the receipt in January of $25,000 from the P. Island Fund; the gift of $11,284, during 12 months, by the Em- ployees of the B. Electric Railway; a contribution to the local Fund of $30,000 a year from the School Teachers of Winnipeg, $45,000 a year from the Civic employees there, and $12,000 a year from A. Maurice Goor, Belgian Consul-Gleneral, was President, and H. On Jan, 26, 1915, the Treneglos sailed from Halifax with $462,500 worth of supplies and on May 5th the St. Alto- gether five steamers had left to this date with 1,031 carloads of supplies of which Ontario sent 156, Nova Scotia 273, New Bruns- wick 102, and the rest scattering in small totals, with 330 included as containing purchases by the Central Committee. 1st and May 18, 1915, the Com- mittee in Regina sent $10,000 and the Saskatchewan Branch, $10,000; the Simcoe County Council voted $7,000 and the Hamil- ton Committee sent $3,500; the Ottawa Women's Canadian Club $4,000, the Winnipeg Committee $27,000 and the Calgary Commit- tee $5,000 ; the Chicoutimi Pulp Co. King Albert, through his Secretary, \\'Tote declaring that he was "profoundly touched by the magnificently generous spirit in which the population of Canada responded to the appeal of your Committee" and expressed his heartfelt thanks. Henderson, the Duke of Norfolk and others, on the Council. 2l8t was stated to total $23,000 or enough to rescue 1,000 Belgian children; visits to Canada in May and October of Rev. They had come from every part of Canada, they represented the very spirit of courage, love of adventure, readiness for war. In spite of all the various calls that have been made for funds to aid our soldiers and sailors and the magnificent response that has been made in each Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 321 and every case, I still feel assured that the warm hearts of all Canadians will respond to this further appeal to enable the Patriotic Fund to continue its splendid work during 1916 and take care of the families of those who are fighting for their Sovereign, the Empire and the Dominion, on the battle-fields of Europe and on the High Seas. Meantime, a series of important incidents had occurred during the year which should be mentioned. gift of $100,- 000; the next was Toronto with $830,463 and then followed Ottawa with $352,288, Quebec and Levis $182,052, Vancouver $166,004, Hamilton, $120,424. Taking the whole 17 months of war only two Ontario counties were non-contributory — Lennox and Middlesex and the lowest per capita amount was 8V2 cents in Parry Sound with $3.30 in Carleton as the highest; in Quebec, Beauce, Chicoutimi, Rouville, Terrebonne, gave practically noth- ing; per capita the lowest amount was 3 cents in five counties and the highest, outside of Montreal and Quebec as the centres, was Sherbrooke with $1.24. To the Belgian Relief Fund contributions continued through- out 1915 and the Central Executive Comjmittee in Montreal of which M. Up to May 18, the total of donations in money or in kind since the War commenced was $2,071,082; between this ^KOTS.-— S«e Provincial affair* under Manitoba's action in tha War. 18th, 1916, $98,422 was received in money donations ^^dth $23,443 as the value of materials, products, etc. Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 323 on Aug. He stated in a letter from Paris to Sir Robert Borden (June 19th) that "it should be a comfort to our friends in Canada to know that the Royal Army Medical Corps and the Canadian A. Not only are wounded brought in and dressed at the earliest possible moment but they are removed to field hospitals by the stretcher bearers and medical officers at the risk of their own lives." Lieut.-Col. Gooder- ham, as President, pledged the co-operation of the Daughters of the Empire, and the Militia Department undertook the cost of maintenance with the Red Cross Society supplying medical com- forts. Most of them were veterans of the South African and other wars and, to them, the new call of Empire and battle was instant and imperative. THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW WAR SERIES Field Marshal The Earl Kitchener, k.g. the Eabl Kitchener, k.g., o.m Frontispiece The Hon. During the year the Montreal branch complained about this condition and a Resolution was passed on Nov. No more loyal citizens could be found in the British Empire than Cardinal Bourne of Westminster, Father Bernard Vaughan, or the Duke of Norfolk; none more insistent as to the justice of the British cause than Archbishop Bruchesi, or Bishop Fallon, or Archbishop Mc Neil in Canada. There are times when we must follow the example set and this is one of them." As to the point of Christianity being opposed to all war the Rev. In con- nection with the British Red Cross appeal at this time the Cath- olic Bishops of Ontario, meeting in Toronto on Oct. An- other one urged German political action in the West : ' * What 's the use of all our associations and societies if we do not devote them to our own interests, if we do not put them in their full strength behind our demands, if we do not lend their help to the few German candidates? 853 LONDON GUARANTEE & ACCIDENT CO., LTD., Toronto 853 WARWICK BROS. 856 FETHERSTONHAUGH & CO., Patent So Ucitors, Toronto 856 JONES & BARLOW, Barristers, Toronto 856 THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, Montreal 857 THE GRAND TRUNK SYSTEM, Montreal 858 THE CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY, Toronto 859 ILLUSTRATIONS Fi BLD Masshai. A good many desertions of soldiers were not directly reported and pay- ments continued to be made for a time to undeserving dependants without claim. In Canada, as in England, the Church leaders were not neutral ; nor were they in France or Belgium, Austria or Germany. Almighty God marshalled His army and cleaned Heaven of the undesirables, giving us an example of the kind of peace He wished in His kingdom. If patriotism ineans anything, and I believe that it means much, if that tense feeling that is abroad means anything, it means that every man and every woman quietly and without assertion before God and the world are prepared to go on and on in the battle that will secure the liberty of the world." He did not shrink from Conscription if 340 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW tlie slacker made it necessary; he had "no sympathy at all with the mothers who are hanging on to the coat-tails of their sons, nor with the wives who are clinging to their husbands;" he believed a million men in Canada should rush to meet the King's call and defend the liberties of their race and Empire. 21, containing 12 columns of war news, was described as follows: "In practically every line of it from start to finish, the German, Austrian and Turkish arms are represented as operating successfully." There, also, were several pro-German literary articles — one of which described a trip around the harbour of Ant- werp and expressed joy at the flying of German flags there. Digitized by the Internet Arciiive in 2007 witin funding from IVIicrosoft Corporation Iittp:// Jk £ I ^f^RARY ) o .^i FOUNDERS OF THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS The late Lord Stratheona and Mount Royal Colonel The Hon. Other incidents of the year included the co-operation of a Canadian Committee of Medical men headed by Dr. Paul's Church, Toronto, and a letter, dated May 11, from Cardinal Mercier expressed earnest thanks for the "splendid effort" and success; a collection by the Montreal Star of a "Shilling fund" for Belgian orphans *NOTB. 18 of the work done by the Toronto Board of Trade, with Arthur Hewitt as Chairman of Committee, in its effort to raise $50,000 yrith the eventual collection of $72,645 for the purpose of aiding Belgium; a contribution of $45,000 on King Albert's fete day (Nov. Formed immediately after the declaration of War on the initiative of A. Farquhar, d.s.o., of the Coldstream Guards and Military Secretary' to the Governor-General of Canada.

||

Manitoba would need nothing; it had given magnificently. Moneys have poured into the treasury of the Fund until the total contributions have reached and exceeded $6,000,000. Colonel Ryerson urged (1) that supplies should be sent through the recog- nized channel of the Society, and (2) that more motor-ambulance should be contributed. 18,734.00 Quebec 78,886.45 New Brunswick 17,307.65 Saskatchewan 72,606 . 24 British Columbia 54,596.63 Alberta 40,729.88 Total $1,106,273.63 The City of Montreal undertook a special campaign and col- lected $100,000. As time passed on the German set- tlers seemed to accept the situation, generally, despite the pes- simistic view of F. German Clubs were allowed in various cities to be centres of enemy talk, if nothing worse, and it was not until rumours of rejoicings as to the Lusitania got abroad that those of Toronto, Montreal and Hamilton were closed.

British Columbia had been hard hit financially and would require $600,000 of which it could raise $400,000. Though anticipating a generous response I was hardly prepared for the magnificent manner in which the call was met. A meeting was held and Committees appointed with H. The Royal North- West Mounted Police, however, were omniprescient in the West; their energy, large powers, and known courage, prevented trouble even where a few isolated communities might have desired to create it; the disarming and registration policy for alien enemies helped to prevent any serious issue. Born at Dresden, Germany, and educated at 364 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW Gottingen, he had lived in Canada since 1873 and been naturalized in or about 1896; he denied the statements absolutely but at once dropped out of various positions such as the Directorate of the Bank of Montreal and of the St. Canadian tolerance of things German during this year gradually lessened but for the first six months of the War it was akin to that of England herself.

In the first 17 months of war the largest contribution sent to the Fund by any one city was that of Montreal with $1,484,341— excluding the C. Winnipeg gave generously ($521,043) but its Association was an independent one.* A certain number of individual or independent subscriptions went direct to the head office of the Fund as with that of the Law Society of Upper Canada, $10,000; a proportion of the C. Other incidents of 1915 included a con- tribution of $5,000 from Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., of Montreal and other cities ; the receipt in January of $25,000 from the P. Island Fund; the gift of $11,284, during 12 months, by the Em- ployees of the B. Electric Railway; a contribution to the local Fund of $30,000 a year from the School Teachers of Winnipeg, $45,000 a year from the Civic employees there, and $12,000 a year from A. Maurice Goor, Belgian Consul-Gleneral, was President, and H. On Jan, 26, 1915, the Treneglos sailed from Halifax with $462,500 worth of supplies and on May 5th the St. Alto- gether five steamers had left to this date with 1,031 carloads of supplies of which Ontario sent 156, Nova Scotia 273, New Bruns- wick 102, and the rest scattering in small totals, with 330 included as containing purchases by the Central Committee. 1st and May 18, 1915, the Com- mittee in Regina sent $10,000 and the Saskatchewan Branch, $10,000; the Simcoe County Council voted $7,000 and the Hamil- ton Committee sent $3,500; the Ottawa Women's Canadian Club $4,000, the Winnipeg Committee $27,000 and the Calgary Commit- tee $5,000 ; the Chicoutimi Pulp Co. King Albert, through his Secretary, \\'Tote declaring that he was "profoundly touched by the magnificently generous spirit in which the population of Canada responded to the appeal of your Committee" and expressed his heartfelt thanks. Henderson, the Duke of Norfolk and others, on the Council. 2l8t was stated to total $23,000 or enough to rescue 1,000 Belgian children; visits to Canada in May and October of Rev. They had come from every part of Canada, they represented the very spirit of courage, love of adventure, readiness for war.

In spite of all the various calls that have been made for funds to aid our soldiers and sailors and the magnificent response that has been made in each Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 321 and every case, I still feel assured that the warm hearts of all Canadians will respond to this further appeal to enable the Patriotic Fund to continue its splendid work during 1916 and take care of the families of those who are fighting for their Sovereign, the Empire and the Dominion, on the battle-fields of Europe and on the High Seas. Meantime, a series of important incidents had occurred during the year which should be mentioned. gift of $100,- 000; the next was Toronto with $830,463 and then followed Ottawa with $352,288, Quebec and Levis $182,052, Vancouver $166,004, Hamilton, $120,424. Taking the whole 17 months of war only two Ontario counties were non-contributory — Lennox and Middlesex and the lowest per capita amount was 8V2 cents in Parry Sound with $3.30 in Carleton as the highest; in Quebec, Beauce, Chicoutimi, Rouville, Terrebonne, gave practically noth- ing; per capita the lowest amount was 3 cents in five counties and the highest, outside of Montreal and Quebec as the centres, was Sherbrooke with $1.24. To the Belgian Relief Fund contributions continued through- out 1915 and the Central Executive Comjmittee in Montreal of which M. Up to May 18, the total of donations in money or in kind since the War commenced was $2,071,082; between this ^KOTS.-— S«e Provincial affair* under Manitoba's action in tha War. 18th, 1916, $98,422 was received in money donations ^^dth $23,443 as the value of materials, products, etc. Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 323 on Aug. He stated in a letter from Paris to Sir Robert Borden (June 19th) that "it should be a comfort to our friends in Canada to know that the Royal Army Medical Corps and the Canadian A. Not only are wounded brought in and dressed at the earliest possible moment but they are removed to field hospitals by the stretcher bearers and medical officers at the risk of their own lives." Lieut.-Col. Gooder- ham, as President, pledged the co-operation of the Daughters of the Empire, and the Militia Department undertook the cost of maintenance with the Red Cross Society supplying medical com- forts. Most of them were veterans of the South African and other wars and, to them, the new call of Empire and battle was instant and imperative.

THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW WAR SERIES Field Marshal The Earl Kitchener, k.g. the Eabl Kitchener, k.g., o.m Frontispiece The Hon. During the year the Montreal branch complained about this condition and a Resolution was passed on Nov. No more loyal citizens could be found in the British Empire than Cardinal Bourne of Westminster, Father Bernard Vaughan, or the Duke of Norfolk; none more insistent as to the justice of the British cause than Archbishop Bruchesi, or Bishop Fallon, or Archbishop Mc Neil in Canada. There are times when we must follow the example set and this is one of them." As to the point of Christianity being opposed to all war the Rev. In con- nection with the British Red Cross appeal at this time the Cath- olic Bishops of Ontario, meeting in Toronto on Oct. An- other one urged German political action in the West : ' * What 's the use of all our associations and societies if we do not devote them to our own interests, if we do not put them in their full strength behind our demands, if we do not lend their help to the few German candidates?

853 LONDON GUARANTEE & ACCIDENT CO., LTD., Toronto 853 WARWICK BROS. 856 FETHERSTONHAUGH & CO., Patent So Ucitors, Toronto 856 JONES & BARLOW, Barristers, Toronto 856 THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, Montreal 857 THE GRAND TRUNK SYSTEM, Montreal 858 THE CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY, Toronto 859 ILLUSTRATIONS Fi BLD Masshai. A good many desertions of soldiers were not directly reported and pay- ments continued to be made for a time to undeserving dependants without claim. In Canada, as in England, the Church leaders were not neutral ; nor were they in France or Belgium, Austria or Germany. Almighty God marshalled His army and cleaned Heaven of the undesirables, giving us an example of the kind of peace He wished in His kingdom. If patriotism ineans anything, and I believe that it means much, if that tense feeling that is abroad means anything, it means that every man and every woman quietly and without assertion before God and the world are prepared to go on and on in the battle that will secure the liberty of the world." He did not shrink from Conscription if 340 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW tlie slacker made it necessary; he had "no sympathy at all with the mothers who are hanging on to the coat-tails of their sons, nor with the wives who are clinging to their husbands;" he believed a million men in Canada should rush to meet the King's call and defend the liberties of their race and Empire. 21, containing 12 columns of war news, was described as follows: "In practically every line of it from start to finish, the German, Austrian and Turkish arms are represented as operating successfully." There, also, were several pro-German literary articles — one of which described a trip around the harbour of Ant- werp and expressed joy at the flying of German flags there.

,106,273.63 The City of Montreal undertook a special campaign and col- lected 0,000. As time passed on the German set- tlers seemed to accept the situation, generally, despite the pes- simistic view of F. German Clubs were allowed in various cities to be centres of enemy talk, if nothing worse, and it was not until rumours of rejoicings as to the Lusitania got abroad that those of Toronto, Montreal and Hamilton were closed.

British Columbia had been hard hit financially and would require 0,000 of which it could raise 0,000. Though anticipating a generous response I was hardly prepared for the magnificent manner in which the call was met. A meeting was held and Committees appointed with H. The Royal North- West Mounted Police, however, were omniprescient in the West; their energy, large powers, and known courage, prevented trouble even where a few isolated communities might have desired to create it; the disarming and registration policy for alien enemies helped to prevent any serious issue. Born at Dresden, Germany, and educated at 364 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW Gottingen, he had lived in Canada since 1873 and been naturalized in or about 1896; he denied the statements absolutely but at once dropped out of various positions such as the Directorate of the Bank of Montreal and of the St. Canadian tolerance of things German during this year gradually lessened but for the first six months of the War it was akin to that of England herself.

In the first 17 months of war the largest contribution sent to the Fund by any one city was that of Montreal with

Manitoba would need nothing; it had given magnificently. Moneys have poured into the treasury of the Fund until the total contributions have reached and exceeded $6,000,000. Colonel Ryerson urged (1) that supplies should be sent through the recog- nized channel of the Society, and (2) that more motor-ambulance should be contributed. 18,734.00 Quebec 78,886.45 New Brunswick 17,307.65 Saskatchewan 72,606 . 24 British Columbia 54,596.63 Alberta 40,729.88 Total $1,106,273.63 The City of Montreal undertook a special campaign and col- lected $100,000. As time passed on the German set- tlers seemed to accept the situation, generally, despite the pes- simistic view of F. German Clubs were allowed in various cities to be centres of enemy talk, if nothing worse, and it was not until rumours of rejoicings as to the Lusitania got abroad that those of Toronto, Montreal and Hamilton were closed. British Columbia had been hard hit financially and would require $600,000 of which it could raise $400,000. Though anticipating a generous response I was hardly prepared for the magnificent manner in which the call was met. A meeting was held and Committees appointed with H. The Royal North- West Mounted Police, however, were omniprescient in the West; their energy, large powers, and known courage, prevented trouble even where a few isolated communities might have desired to create it; the disarming and registration policy for alien enemies helped to prevent any serious issue. Born at Dresden, Germany, and educated at 364 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW Gottingen, he had lived in Canada since 1873 and been naturalized in or about 1896; he denied the statements absolutely but at once dropped out of various positions such as the Directorate of the Bank of Montreal and of the St. Canadian tolerance of things German during this year gradually lessened but for the first six months of the War it was akin to that of England herself. In the first 17 months of war the largest contribution sent to the Fund by any one city was that of Montreal with $1,484,341— excluding the C. Winnipeg gave generously ($521,043) but its Association was an independent one.* A certain number of individual or independent subscriptions went direct to the head office of the Fund as with that of the Law Society of Upper Canada, $10,000; a proportion of the C. Other incidents of 1915 included a con- tribution of $5,000 from Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., of Montreal and other cities ; the receipt in January of $25,000 from the P. Island Fund; the gift of $11,284, during 12 months, by the Em- ployees of the B. Electric Railway; a contribution to the local Fund of $30,000 a year from the School Teachers of Winnipeg, $45,000 a year from the Civic employees there, and $12,000 a year from A. Maurice Goor, Belgian Consul-Gleneral, was President, and H. On Jan, 26, 1915, the Treneglos sailed from Halifax with $462,500 worth of supplies and on May 5th the St. Alto- gether five steamers had left to this date with 1,031 carloads of supplies of which Ontario sent 156, Nova Scotia 273, New Bruns- wick 102, and the rest scattering in small totals, with 330 included as containing purchases by the Central Committee. 1st and May 18, 1915, the Com- mittee in Regina sent $10,000 and the Saskatchewan Branch, $10,000; the Simcoe County Council voted $7,000 and the Hamil- ton Committee sent $3,500; the Ottawa Women's Canadian Club $4,000, the Winnipeg Committee $27,000 and the Calgary Commit- tee $5,000 ; the Chicoutimi Pulp Co. King Albert, through his Secretary, \\'Tote declaring that he was "profoundly touched by the magnificently generous spirit in which the population of Canada responded to the appeal of your Committee" and expressed his heartfelt thanks. Henderson, the Duke of Norfolk and others, on the Council. 2l8t was stated to total $23,000 or enough to rescue 1,000 Belgian children; visits to Canada in May and October of Rev. They had come from every part of Canada, they represented the very spirit of courage, love of adventure, readiness for war. In spite of all the various calls that have been made for funds to aid our soldiers and sailors and the magnificent response that has been made in each Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 321 and every case, I still feel assured that the warm hearts of all Canadians will respond to this further appeal to enable the Patriotic Fund to continue its splendid work during 1916 and take care of the families of those who are fighting for their Sovereign, the Empire and the Dominion, on the battle-fields of Europe and on the High Seas. Meantime, a series of important incidents had occurred during the year which should be mentioned. gift of $100,- 000; the next was Toronto with $830,463 and then followed Ottawa with $352,288, Quebec and Levis $182,052, Vancouver $166,004, Hamilton, $120,424. Taking the whole 17 months of war only two Ontario counties were non-contributory — Lennox and Middlesex and the lowest per capita amount was 8V2 cents in Parry Sound with $3.30 in Carleton as the highest; in Quebec, Beauce, Chicoutimi, Rouville, Terrebonne, gave practically noth- ing; per capita the lowest amount was 3 cents in five counties and the highest, outside of Montreal and Quebec as the centres, was Sherbrooke with $1.24. To the Belgian Relief Fund contributions continued through- out 1915 and the Central Executive Comjmittee in Montreal of which M. Up to May 18, the total of donations in money or in kind since the War commenced was $2,071,082; between this ^KOTS.-— S«e Provincial affair* under Manitoba's action in tha War. 18th, 1916, $98,422 was received in money donations ^^dth $23,443 as the value of materials, products, etc. Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 323 on Aug. He stated in a letter from Paris to Sir Robert Borden (June 19th) that "it should be a comfort to our friends in Canada to know that the Royal Army Medical Corps and the Canadian A. Not only are wounded brought in and dressed at the earliest possible moment but they are removed to field hospitals by the stretcher bearers and medical officers at the risk of their own lives." Lieut.-Col. Gooder- ham, as President, pledged the co-operation of the Daughters of the Empire, and the Militia Department undertook the cost of maintenance with the Red Cross Society supplying medical com- forts. Most of them were veterans of the South African and other wars and, to them, the new call of Empire and battle was instant and imperative. THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW WAR SERIES Field Marshal The Earl Kitchener, k.g. the Eabl Kitchener, k.g., o.m Frontispiece The Hon. During the year the Montreal branch complained about this condition and a Resolution was passed on Nov. No more loyal citizens could be found in the British Empire than Cardinal Bourne of Westminster, Father Bernard Vaughan, or the Duke of Norfolk; none more insistent as to the justice of the British cause than Archbishop Bruchesi, or Bishop Fallon, or Archbishop Mc Neil in Canada. There are times when we must follow the example set and this is one of them." As to the point of Christianity being opposed to all war the Rev. In con- nection with the British Red Cross appeal at this time the Cath- olic Bishops of Ontario, meeting in Toronto on Oct. An- other one urged German political action in the West : ' * What 's the use of all our associations and societies if we do not devote them to our own interests, if we do not put them in their full strength behind our demands, if we do not lend their help to the few German candidates? 853 LONDON GUARANTEE & ACCIDENT CO., LTD., Toronto 853 WARWICK BROS. 856 FETHERSTONHAUGH & CO., Patent So Ucitors, Toronto 856 JONES & BARLOW, Barristers, Toronto 856 THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, Montreal 857 THE GRAND TRUNK SYSTEM, Montreal 858 THE CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY, Toronto 859 ILLUSTRATIONS Fi BLD Masshai. A good many desertions of soldiers were not directly reported and pay- ments continued to be made for a time to undeserving dependants without claim. In Canada, as in England, the Church leaders were not neutral ; nor were they in France or Belgium, Austria or Germany. Almighty God marshalled His army and cleaned Heaven of the undesirables, giving us an example of the kind of peace He wished in His kingdom. If patriotism ineans anything, and I believe that it means much, if that tense feeling that is abroad means anything, it means that every man and every woman quietly and without assertion before God and the world are prepared to go on and on in the battle that will secure the liberty of the world." He did not shrink from Conscription if 340 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW tlie slacker made it necessary; he had "no sympathy at all with the mothers who are hanging on to the coat-tails of their sons, nor with the wives who are clinging to their husbands;" he believed a million men in Canada should rush to meet the King's call and defend the liberties of their race and Empire. 21, containing 12 columns of war news, was described as follows: "In practically every line of it from start to finish, the German, Austrian and Turkish arms are represented as operating successfully." There, also, were several pro-German literary articles — one of which described a trip around the harbour of Ant- werp and expressed joy at the flying of German flags there. Digitized by the Internet Arciiive in 2007 witin funding from IVIicrosoft Corporation Iittp:// Jk £ I ^f^RARY ) o .^i FOUNDERS OF THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS The late Lord Stratheona and Mount Royal Colonel The Hon. Other incidents of the year included the co-operation of a Canadian Committee of Medical men headed by Dr. Paul's Church, Toronto, and a letter, dated May 11, from Cardinal Mercier expressed earnest thanks for the "splendid effort" and success; a collection by the Montreal Star of a "Shilling fund" for Belgian orphans *NOTB. 18 of the work done by the Toronto Board of Trade, with Arthur Hewitt as Chairman of Committee, in its effort to raise $50,000 yrith the eventual collection of $72,645 for the purpose of aiding Belgium; a contribution of $45,000 on King Albert's fete day (Nov. Formed immediately after the declaration of War on the initiative of A. Farquhar, d.s.o., of the Coldstream Guards and Military Secretary' to the Governor-General of Canada.

||

Manitoba would need nothing; it had given magnificently. Moneys have poured into the treasury of the Fund until the total contributions have reached and exceeded $6,000,000. Colonel Ryerson urged (1) that supplies should be sent through the recog- nized channel of the Society, and (2) that more motor-ambulance should be contributed. 18,734.00 Quebec 78,886.45 New Brunswick 17,307.65 Saskatchewan 72,606 . 24 British Columbia 54,596.63 Alberta 40,729.88 Total $1,106,273.63 The City of Montreal undertook a special campaign and col- lected $100,000. As time passed on the German set- tlers seemed to accept the situation, generally, despite the pes- simistic view of F. German Clubs were allowed in various cities to be centres of enemy talk, if nothing worse, and it was not until rumours of rejoicings as to the Lusitania got abroad that those of Toronto, Montreal and Hamilton were closed.

British Columbia had been hard hit financially and would require $600,000 of which it could raise $400,000. Though anticipating a generous response I was hardly prepared for the magnificent manner in which the call was met. A meeting was held and Committees appointed with H. The Royal North- West Mounted Police, however, were omniprescient in the West; their energy, large powers, and known courage, prevented trouble even where a few isolated communities might have desired to create it; the disarming and registration policy for alien enemies helped to prevent any serious issue. Born at Dresden, Germany, and educated at 364 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW Gottingen, he had lived in Canada since 1873 and been naturalized in or about 1896; he denied the statements absolutely but at once dropped out of various positions such as the Directorate of the Bank of Montreal and of the St. Canadian tolerance of things German during this year gradually lessened but for the first six months of the War it was akin to that of England herself.

In the first 17 months of war the largest contribution sent to the Fund by any one city was that of Montreal with $1,484,341— excluding the C. Winnipeg gave generously ($521,043) but its Association was an independent one.* A certain number of individual or independent subscriptions went direct to the head office of the Fund as with that of the Law Society of Upper Canada, $10,000; a proportion of the C. Other incidents of 1915 included a con- tribution of $5,000 from Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., of Montreal and other cities ; the receipt in January of $25,000 from the P. Island Fund; the gift of $11,284, during 12 months, by the Em- ployees of the B. Electric Railway; a contribution to the local Fund of $30,000 a year from the School Teachers of Winnipeg, $45,000 a year from the Civic employees there, and $12,000 a year from A. Maurice Goor, Belgian Consul-Gleneral, was President, and H. On Jan, 26, 1915, the Treneglos sailed from Halifax with $462,500 worth of supplies and on May 5th the St. Alto- gether five steamers had left to this date with 1,031 carloads of supplies of which Ontario sent 156, Nova Scotia 273, New Bruns- wick 102, and the rest scattering in small totals, with 330 included as containing purchases by the Central Committee. 1st and May 18, 1915, the Com- mittee in Regina sent $10,000 and the Saskatchewan Branch, $10,000; the Simcoe County Council voted $7,000 and the Hamil- ton Committee sent $3,500; the Ottawa Women's Canadian Club $4,000, the Winnipeg Committee $27,000 and the Calgary Commit- tee $5,000 ; the Chicoutimi Pulp Co. King Albert, through his Secretary, \\'Tote declaring that he was "profoundly touched by the magnificently generous spirit in which the population of Canada responded to the appeal of your Committee" and expressed his heartfelt thanks. Henderson, the Duke of Norfolk and others, on the Council. 2l8t was stated to total $23,000 or enough to rescue 1,000 Belgian children; visits to Canada in May and October of Rev. They had come from every part of Canada, they represented the very spirit of courage, love of adventure, readiness for war.

In spite of all the various calls that have been made for funds to aid our soldiers and sailors and the magnificent response that has been made in each Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 321 and every case, I still feel assured that the warm hearts of all Canadians will respond to this further appeal to enable the Patriotic Fund to continue its splendid work during 1916 and take care of the families of those who are fighting for their Sovereign, the Empire and the Dominion, on the battle-fields of Europe and on the High Seas. Meantime, a series of important incidents had occurred during the year which should be mentioned. gift of $100,- 000; the next was Toronto with $830,463 and then followed Ottawa with $352,288, Quebec and Levis $182,052, Vancouver $166,004, Hamilton, $120,424. Taking the whole 17 months of war only two Ontario counties were non-contributory — Lennox and Middlesex and the lowest per capita amount was 8V2 cents in Parry Sound with $3.30 in Carleton as the highest; in Quebec, Beauce, Chicoutimi, Rouville, Terrebonne, gave practically noth- ing; per capita the lowest amount was 3 cents in five counties and the highest, outside of Montreal and Quebec as the centres, was Sherbrooke with $1.24. To the Belgian Relief Fund contributions continued through- out 1915 and the Central Executive Comjmittee in Montreal of which M. Up to May 18, the total of donations in money or in kind since the War commenced was $2,071,082; between this ^KOTS.-— S«e Provincial affair* under Manitoba's action in tha War. 18th, 1916, $98,422 was received in money donations ^^dth $23,443 as the value of materials, products, etc. Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 323 on Aug. He stated in a letter from Paris to Sir Robert Borden (June 19th) that "it should be a comfort to our friends in Canada to know that the Royal Army Medical Corps and the Canadian A. Not only are wounded brought in and dressed at the earliest possible moment but they are removed to field hospitals by the stretcher bearers and medical officers at the risk of their own lives." Lieut.-Col. Gooder- ham, as President, pledged the co-operation of the Daughters of the Empire, and the Militia Department undertook the cost of maintenance with the Red Cross Society supplying medical com- forts. Most of them were veterans of the South African and other wars and, to them, the new call of Empire and battle was instant and imperative.

THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW WAR SERIES Field Marshal The Earl Kitchener, k.g. the Eabl Kitchener, k.g., o.m Frontispiece The Hon. During the year the Montreal branch complained about this condition and a Resolution was passed on Nov. No more loyal citizens could be found in the British Empire than Cardinal Bourne of Westminster, Father Bernard Vaughan, or the Duke of Norfolk; none more insistent as to the justice of the British cause than Archbishop Bruchesi, or Bishop Fallon, or Archbishop Mc Neil in Canada. There are times when we must follow the example set and this is one of them." As to the point of Christianity being opposed to all war the Rev. In con- nection with the British Red Cross appeal at this time the Cath- olic Bishops of Ontario, meeting in Toronto on Oct. An- other one urged German political action in the West : ' * What 's the use of all our associations and societies if we do not devote them to our own interests, if we do not put them in their full strength behind our demands, if we do not lend their help to the few German candidates?

853 LONDON GUARANTEE & ACCIDENT CO., LTD., Toronto 853 WARWICK BROS. 856 FETHERSTONHAUGH & CO., Patent So Ucitors, Toronto 856 JONES & BARLOW, Barristers, Toronto 856 THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, Montreal 857 THE GRAND TRUNK SYSTEM, Montreal 858 THE CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY, Toronto 859 ILLUSTRATIONS Fi BLD Masshai. A good many desertions of soldiers were not directly reported and pay- ments continued to be made for a time to undeserving dependants without claim. In Canada, as in England, the Church leaders were not neutral ; nor were they in France or Belgium, Austria or Germany. Almighty God marshalled His army and cleaned Heaven of the undesirables, giving us an example of the kind of peace He wished in His kingdom. If patriotism ineans anything, and I believe that it means much, if that tense feeling that is abroad means anything, it means that every man and every woman quietly and without assertion before God and the world are prepared to go on and on in the battle that will secure the liberty of the world." He did not shrink from Conscription if 340 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW tlie slacker made it necessary; he had "no sympathy at all with the mothers who are hanging on to the coat-tails of their sons, nor with the wives who are clinging to their husbands;" he believed a million men in Canada should rush to meet the King's call and defend the liberties of their race and Empire. 21, containing 12 columns of war news, was described as follows: "In practically every line of it from start to finish, the German, Austrian and Turkish arms are represented as operating successfully." There, also, were several pro-German literary articles — one of which described a trip around the harbour of Ant- werp and expressed joy at the flying of German flags there.

,484,341— excluding the C. Winnipeg gave generously (1,043) but its Association was an independent one.* A certain number of individual or independent subscriptions went direct to the head office of the Fund as with that of the Law Society of Upper Canada, ,000; a proportion of the C. Other incidents of 1915 included a con- tribution of ,000 from Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., of Montreal and other cities ; the receipt in January of ,000 from the P. Island Fund; the gift of ,284, during 12 months, by the Em- ployees of the B. Electric Railway; a contribution to the local Fund of ,000 a year from the School Teachers of Winnipeg, ,000 a year from the Civic employees there, and ,000 a year from A. Maurice Goor, Belgian Consul-Gleneral, was President, and H. On Jan, 26, 1915, the Treneglos sailed from Halifax with 2,500 worth of supplies and on May 5th the St. Alto- gether five steamers had left to this date with 1,031 carloads of supplies of which Ontario sent 156, Nova Scotia 273, New Bruns- wick 102, and the rest scattering in small totals, with 330 included as containing purchases by the Central Committee. 1st and May 18, 1915, the Com- mittee in Regina sent ,000 and the Saskatchewan Branch, ,000; the Simcoe County Council voted ,000 and the Hamil- ton Committee sent ,500; the Ottawa Women's Canadian Club ,000, the Winnipeg Committee ,000 and the Calgary Commit- tee ,000 ; the Chicoutimi Pulp Co. King Albert, through his Secretary, \'Tote declaring that he was "profoundly touched by the magnificently generous spirit in which the population of Canada responded to the appeal of your Committee" and expressed his heartfelt thanks. Henderson, the Duke of Norfolk and others, on the Council. 2l8t was stated to total ,000 or enough to rescue 1,000 Belgian children; visits to Canada in May and October of Rev. They had come from every part of Canada, they represented the very spirit of courage, love of adventure, readiness for war.

In spite of all the various calls that have been made for funds to aid our soldiers and sailors and the magnificent response that has been made in each Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 321 and every case, I still feel assured that the warm hearts of all Canadians will respond to this further appeal to enable the Patriotic Fund to continue its splendid work during 1916 and take care of the families of those who are fighting for their Sovereign, the Empire and the Dominion, on the battle-fields of Europe and on the High Seas. Meantime, a series of important incidents had occurred during the year which should be mentioned. gift of 0,- 000; the next was Toronto with 0,463 and then followed Ottawa with 2,288, Quebec and Levis 2,052, Vancouver 6,004, Hamilton, 0,424. Taking the whole 17 months of war only two Ontario counties were non-contributory — Lennox and Middlesex and the lowest per capita amount was 8V2 cents in Parry Sound with .30 in Carleton as the highest; in Quebec, Beauce, Chicoutimi, Rouville, Terrebonne, gave practically noth- ing; per capita the lowest amount was 3 cents in five counties and the highest, outside of Montreal and Quebec as the centres, was Sherbrooke with

Manitoba would need nothing; it had given magnificently. Moneys have poured into the treasury of the Fund until the total contributions have reached and exceeded $6,000,000. Colonel Ryerson urged (1) that supplies should be sent through the recog- nized channel of the Society, and (2) that more motor-ambulance should be contributed. 18,734.00 Quebec 78,886.45 New Brunswick 17,307.65 Saskatchewan 72,606 . 24 British Columbia 54,596.63 Alberta 40,729.88 Total $1,106,273.63 The City of Montreal undertook a special campaign and col- lected $100,000. As time passed on the German set- tlers seemed to accept the situation, generally, despite the pes- simistic view of F. German Clubs were allowed in various cities to be centres of enemy talk, if nothing worse, and it was not until rumours of rejoicings as to the Lusitania got abroad that those of Toronto, Montreal and Hamilton were closed. British Columbia had been hard hit financially and would require $600,000 of which it could raise $400,000. Though anticipating a generous response I was hardly prepared for the magnificent manner in which the call was met. A meeting was held and Committees appointed with H. The Royal North- West Mounted Police, however, were omniprescient in the West; their energy, large powers, and known courage, prevented trouble even where a few isolated communities might have desired to create it; the disarming and registration policy for alien enemies helped to prevent any serious issue. Born at Dresden, Germany, and educated at 364 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW Gottingen, he had lived in Canada since 1873 and been naturalized in or about 1896; he denied the statements absolutely but at once dropped out of various positions such as the Directorate of the Bank of Montreal and of the St. Canadian tolerance of things German during this year gradually lessened but for the first six months of the War it was akin to that of England herself. In the first 17 months of war the largest contribution sent to the Fund by any one city was that of Montreal with $1,484,341— excluding the C. Winnipeg gave generously ($521,043) but its Association was an independent one.* A certain number of individual or independent subscriptions went direct to the head office of the Fund as with that of the Law Society of Upper Canada, $10,000; a proportion of the C. Other incidents of 1915 included a con- tribution of $5,000 from Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., of Montreal and other cities ; the receipt in January of $25,000 from the P. Island Fund; the gift of $11,284, during 12 months, by the Em- ployees of the B. Electric Railway; a contribution to the local Fund of $30,000 a year from the School Teachers of Winnipeg, $45,000 a year from the Civic employees there, and $12,000 a year from A. Maurice Goor, Belgian Consul-Gleneral, was President, and H. On Jan, 26, 1915, the Treneglos sailed from Halifax with $462,500 worth of supplies and on May 5th the St. Alto- gether five steamers had left to this date with 1,031 carloads of supplies of which Ontario sent 156, Nova Scotia 273, New Bruns- wick 102, and the rest scattering in small totals, with 330 included as containing purchases by the Central Committee. 1st and May 18, 1915, the Com- mittee in Regina sent $10,000 and the Saskatchewan Branch, $10,000; the Simcoe County Council voted $7,000 and the Hamil- ton Committee sent $3,500; the Ottawa Women's Canadian Club $4,000, the Winnipeg Committee $27,000 and the Calgary Commit- tee $5,000 ; the Chicoutimi Pulp Co. King Albert, through his Secretary, \\'Tote declaring that he was "profoundly touched by the magnificently generous spirit in which the population of Canada responded to the appeal of your Committee" and expressed his heartfelt thanks. Henderson, the Duke of Norfolk and others, on the Council. 2l8t was stated to total $23,000 or enough to rescue 1,000 Belgian children; visits to Canada in May and October of Rev. They had come from every part of Canada, they represented the very spirit of courage, love of adventure, readiness for war. In spite of all the various calls that have been made for funds to aid our soldiers and sailors and the magnificent response that has been made in each Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 321 and every case, I still feel assured that the warm hearts of all Canadians will respond to this further appeal to enable the Patriotic Fund to continue its splendid work during 1916 and take care of the families of those who are fighting for their Sovereign, the Empire and the Dominion, on the battle-fields of Europe and on the High Seas. Meantime, a series of important incidents had occurred during the year which should be mentioned. gift of $100,- 000; the next was Toronto with $830,463 and then followed Ottawa with $352,288, Quebec and Levis $182,052, Vancouver $166,004, Hamilton, $120,424. Taking the whole 17 months of war only two Ontario counties were non-contributory — Lennox and Middlesex and the lowest per capita amount was 8V2 cents in Parry Sound with $3.30 in Carleton as the highest; in Quebec, Beauce, Chicoutimi, Rouville, Terrebonne, gave practically noth- ing; per capita the lowest amount was 3 cents in five counties and the highest, outside of Montreal and Quebec as the centres, was Sherbrooke with $1.24. To the Belgian Relief Fund contributions continued through- out 1915 and the Central Executive Comjmittee in Montreal of which M. Up to May 18, the total of donations in money or in kind since the War commenced was $2,071,082; between this ^KOTS.-— S«e Provincial affair* under Manitoba's action in tha War. 18th, 1916, $98,422 was received in money donations ^^dth $23,443 as the value of materials, products, etc. Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 323 on Aug. He stated in a letter from Paris to Sir Robert Borden (June 19th) that "it should be a comfort to our friends in Canada to know that the Royal Army Medical Corps and the Canadian A. Not only are wounded brought in and dressed at the earliest possible moment but they are removed to field hospitals by the stretcher bearers and medical officers at the risk of their own lives." Lieut.-Col. Gooder- ham, as President, pledged the co-operation of the Daughters of the Empire, and the Militia Department undertook the cost of maintenance with the Red Cross Society supplying medical com- forts. Most of them were veterans of the South African and other wars and, to them, the new call of Empire and battle was instant and imperative. THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW WAR SERIES Field Marshal The Earl Kitchener, k.g. the Eabl Kitchener, k.g., o.m Frontispiece The Hon. During the year the Montreal branch complained about this condition and a Resolution was passed on Nov. No more loyal citizens could be found in the British Empire than Cardinal Bourne of Westminster, Father Bernard Vaughan, or the Duke of Norfolk; none more insistent as to the justice of the British cause than Archbishop Bruchesi, or Bishop Fallon, or Archbishop Mc Neil in Canada. There are times when we must follow the example set and this is one of them." As to the point of Christianity being opposed to all war the Rev. In con- nection with the British Red Cross appeal at this time the Cath- olic Bishops of Ontario, meeting in Toronto on Oct. An- other one urged German political action in the West : ' * What 's the use of all our associations and societies if we do not devote them to our own interests, if we do not put them in their full strength behind our demands, if we do not lend their help to the few German candidates? 853 LONDON GUARANTEE & ACCIDENT CO., LTD., Toronto 853 WARWICK BROS. 856 FETHERSTONHAUGH & CO., Patent So Ucitors, Toronto 856 JONES & BARLOW, Barristers, Toronto 856 THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, Montreal 857 THE GRAND TRUNK SYSTEM, Montreal 858 THE CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY, Toronto 859 ILLUSTRATIONS Fi BLD Masshai. A good many desertions of soldiers were not directly reported and pay- ments continued to be made for a time to undeserving dependants without claim. In Canada, as in England, the Church leaders were not neutral ; nor were they in France or Belgium, Austria or Germany. Almighty God marshalled His army and cleaned Heaven of the undesirables, giving us an example of the kind of peace He wished in His kingdom. If patriotism ineans anything, and I believe that it means much, if that tense feeling that is abroad means anything, it means that every man and every woman quietly and without assertion before God and the world are prepared to go on and on in the battle that will secure the liberty of the world." He did not shrink from Conscription if 340 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW tlie slacker made it necessary; he had "no sympathy at all with the mothers who are hanging on to the coat-tails of their sons, nor with the wives who are clinging to their husbands;" he believed a million men in Canada should rush to meet the King's call and defend the liberties of their race and Empire. 21, containing 12 columns of war news, was described as follows: "In practically every line of it from start to finish, the German, Austrian and Turkish arms are represented as operating successfully." There, also, were several pro-German literary articles — one of which described a trip around the harbour of Ant- werp and expressed joy at the flying of German flags there. Digitized by the Internet Arciiive in 2007 witin funding from IVIicrosoft Corporation Iittp:// Jk £ I ^f^RARY ) o .^i FOUNDERS OF THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS The late Lord Stratheona and Mount Royal Colonel The Hon. Other incidents of the year included the co-operation of a Canadian Committee of Medical men headed by Dr. Paul's Church, Toronto, and a letter, dated May 11, from Cardinal Mercier expressed earnest thanks for the "splendid effort" and success; a collection by the Montreal Star of a "Shilling fund" for Belgian orphans *NOTB. 18 of the work done by the Toronto Board of Trade, with Arthur Hewitt as Chairman of Committee, in its effort to raise $50,000 yrith the eventual collection of $72,645 for the purpose of aiding Belgium; a contribution of $45,000 on King Albert's fete day (Nov. Formed immediately after the declaration of War on the initiative of A. Farquhar, d.s.o., of the Coldstream Guards and Military Secretary' to the Governor-General of Canada.

||

Manitoba would need nothing; it had given magnificently. Moneys have poured into the treasury of the Fund until the total contributions have reached and exceeded $6,000,000. Colonel Ryerson urged (1) that supplies should be sent through the recog- nized channel of the Society, and (2) that more motor-ambulance should be contributed. 18,734.00 Quebec 78,886.45 New Brunswick 17,307.65 Saskatchewan 72,606 . 24 British Columbia 54,596.63 Alberta 40,729.88 Total $1,106,273.63 The City of Montreal undertook a special campaign and col- lected $100,000. As time passed on the German set- tlers seemed to accept the situation, generally, despite the pes- simistic view of F. German Clubs were allowed in various cities to be centres of enemy talk, if nothing worse, and it was not until rumours of rejoicings as to the Lusitania got abroad that those of Toronto, Montreal and Hamilton were closed.

British Columbia had been hard hit financially and would require $600,000 of which it could raise $400,000. Though anticipating a generous response I was hardly prepared for the magnificent manner in which the call was met. A meeting was held and Committees appointed with H. The Royal North- West Mounted Police, however, were omniprescient in the West; their energy, large powers, and known courage, prevented trouble even where a few isolated communities might have desired to create it; the disarming and registration policy for alien enemies helped to prevent any serious issue. Born at Dresden, Germany, and educated at 364 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW Gottingen, he had lived in Canada since 1873 and been naturalized in or about 1896; he denied the statements absolutely but at once dropped out of various positions such as the Directorate of the Bank of Montreal and of the St. Canadian tolerance of things German during this year gradually lessened but for the first six months of the War it was akin to that of England herself.

In the first 17 months of war the largest contribution sent to the Fund by any one city was that of Montreal with $1,484,341— excluding the C. Winnipeg gave generously ($521,043) but its Association was an independent one.* A certain number of individual or independent subscriptions went direct to the head office of the Fund as with that of the Law Society of Upper Canada, $10,000; a proportion of the C. Other incidents of 1915 included a con- tribution of $5,000 from Brandram-Henderson, Ltd., of Montreal and other cities ; the receipt in January of $25,000 from the P. Island Fund; the gift of $11,284, during 12 months, by the Em- ployees of the B. Electric Railway; a contribution to the local Fund of $30,000 a year from the School Teachers of Winnipeg, $45,000 a year from the Civic employees there, and $12,000 a year from A. Maurice Goor, Belgian Consul-Gleneral, was President, and H. On Jan, 26, 1915, the Treneglos sailed from Halifax with $462,500 worth of supplies and on May 5th the St. Alto- gether five steamers had left to this date with 1,031 carloads of supplies of which Ontario sent 156, Nova Scotia 273, New Bruns- wick 102, and the rest scattering in small totals, with 330 included as containing purchases by the Central Committee. 1st and May 18, 1915, the Com- mittee in Regina sent $10,000 and the Saskatchewan Branch, $10,000; the Simcoe County Council voted $7,000 and the Hamil- ton Committee sent $3,500; the Ottawa Women's Canadian Club $4,000, the Winnipeg Committee $27,000 and the Calgary Commit- tee $5,000 ; the Chicoutimi Pulp Co. King Albert, through his Secretary, \\'Tote declaring that he was "profoundly touched by the magnificently generous spirit in which the population of Canada responded to the appeal of your Committee" and expressed his heartfelt thanks. Henderson, the Duke of Norfolk and others, on the Council. 2l8t was stated to total $23,000 or enough to rescue 1,000 Belgian children; visits to Canada in May and October of Rev. They had come from every part of Canada, they represented the very spirit of courage, love of adventure, readiness for war.

In spite of all the various calls that have been made for funds to aid our soldiers and sailors and the magnificent response that has been made in each Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 321 and every case, I still feel assured that the warm hearts of all Canadians will respond to this further appeal to enable the Patriotic Fund to continue its splendid work during 1916 and take care of the families of those who are fighting for their Sovereign, the Empire and the Dominion, on the battle-fields of Europe and on the High Seas. Meantime, a series of important incidents had occurred during the year which should be mentioned. gift of $100,- 000; the next was Toronto with $830,463 and then followed Ottawa with $352,288, Quebec and Levis $182,052, Vancouver $166,004, Hamilton, $120,424. Taking the whole 17 months of war only two Ontario counties were non-contributory — Lennox and Middlesex and the lowest per capita amount was 8V2 cents in Parry Sound with $3.30 in Carleton as the highest; in Quebec, Beauce, Chicoutimi, Rouville, Terrebonne, gave practically noth- ing; per capita the lowest amount was 3 cents in five counties and the highest, outside of Montreal and Quebec as the centres, was Sherbrooke with $1.24. To the Belgian Relief Fund contributions continued through- out 1915 and the Central Executive Comjmittee in Montreal of which M. Up to May 18, the total of donations in money or in kind since the War commenced was $2,071,082; between this ^KOTS.-— S«e Provincial affair* under Manitoba's action in tha War. 18th, 1916, $98,422 was received in money donations ^^dth $23,443 as the value of materials, products, etc. Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 323 on Aug. He stated in a letter from Paris to Sir Robert Borden (June 19th) that "it should be a comfort to our friends in Canada to know that the Royal Army Medical Corps and the Canadian A. Not only are wounded brought in and dressed at the earliest possible moment but they are removed to field hospitals by the stretcher bearers and medical officers at the risk of their own lives." Lieut.-Col. Gooder- ham, as President, pledged the co-operation of the Daughters of the Empire, and the Militia Department undertook the cost of maintenance with the Red Cross Society supplying medical com- forts. Most of them were veterans of the South African and other wars and, to them, the new call of Empire and battle was instant and imperative.

THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW WAR SERIES Field Marshal The Earl Kitchener, k.g. the Eabl Kitchener, k.g., o.m Frontispiece The Hon. During the year the Montreal branch complained about this condition and a Resolution was passed on Nov. No more loyal citizens could be found in the British Empire than Cardinal Bourne of Westminster, Father Bernard Vaughan, or the Duke of Norfolk; none more insistent as to the justice of the British cause than Archbishop Bruchesi, or Bishop Fallon, or Archbishop Mc Neil in Canada. There are times when we must follow the example set and this is one of them." As to the point of Christianity being opposed to all war the Rev. In con- nection with the British Red Cross appeal at this time the Cath- olic Bishops of Ontario, meeting in Toronto on Oct. An- other one urged German political action in the West : ' * What 's the use of all our associations and societies if we do not devote them to our own interests, if we do not put them in their full strength behind our demands, if we do not lend their help to the few German candidates?

853 LONDON GUARANTEE & ACCIDENT CO., LTD., Toronto 853 WARWICK BROS. 856 FETHERSTONHAUGH & CO., Patent So Ucitors, Toronto 856 JONES & BARLOW, Barristers, Toronto 856 THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, Montreal 857 THE GRAND TRUNK SYSTEM, Montreal 858 THE CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY, Toronto 859 ILLUSTRATIONS Fi BLD Masshai. A good many desertions of soldiers were not directly reported and pay- ments continued to be made for a time to undeserving dependants without claim. In Canada, as in England, the Church leaders were not neutral ; nor were they in France or Belgium, Austria or Germany. Almighty God marshalled His army and cleaned Heaven of the undesirables, giving us an example of the kind of peace He wished in His kingdom. If patriotism ineans anything, and I believe that it means much, if that tense feeling that is abroad means anything, it means that every man and every woman quietly and without assertion before God and the world are prepared to go on and on in the battle that will secure the liberty of the world." He did not shrink from Conscription if 340 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW tlie slacker made it necessary; he had "no sympathy at all with the mothers who are hanging on to the coat-tails of their sons, nor with the wives who are clinging to their husbands;" he believed a million men in Canada should rush to meet the King's call and defend the liberties of their race and Empire. 21, containing 12 columns of war news, was described as follows: "In practically every line of it from start to finish, the German, Austrian and Turkish arms are represented as operating successfully." There, also, were several pro-German literary articles — one of which described a trip around the harbour of Ant- werp and expressed joy at the flying of German flags there.

.24. To the Belgian Relief Fund contributions continued through- out 1915 and the Central Executive Comjmittee in Montreal of which M. Up to May 18, the total of donations in money or in kind since the War commenced was ,071,082; between this ^KOTS.-— S«e Provincial affair* under Manitoba's action in tha War. 18th, 1916, ,422 was received in money donations ^^dth ,443 as the value of materials, products, etc. Patriotic Organizations and War Contributions 323 on Aug. He stated in a letter from Paris to Sir Robert Borden (June 19th) that "it should be a comfort to our friends in Canada to know that the Royal Army Medical Corps and the Canadian A. Not only are wounded brought in and dressed at the earliest possible moment but they are removed to field hospitals by the stretcher bearers and medical officers at the risk of their own lives." Lieut.-Col. Gooder- ham, as President, pledged the co-operation of the Daughters of the Empire, and the Militia Department undertook the cost of maintenance with the Red Cross Society supplying medical com- forts. Most of them were veterans of the South African and other wars and, to them, the new call of Empire and battle was instant and imperative.

THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW WAR SERIES Field Marshal The Earl Kitchener, k.g. the Eabl Kitchener, k.g., o.m Frontispiece The Hon. During the year the Montreal branch complained about this condition and a Resolution was passed on Nov. No more loyal citizens could be found in the British Empire than Cardinal Bourne of Westminster, Father Bernard Vaughan, or the Duke of Norfolk; none more insistent as to the justice of the British cause than Archbishop Bruchesi, or Bishop Fallon, or Archbishop Mc Neil in Canada. There are times when we must follow the example set and this is one of them." As to the point of Christianity being opposed to all war the Rev. In con- nection with the British Red Cross appeal at this time the Cath- olic Bishops of Ontario, meeting in Toronto on Oct. An- other one urged German political action in the West : ' * What 's the use of all our associations and societies if we do not devote them to our own interests, if we do not put them in their full strength behind our demands, if we do not lend their help to the few German candidates?

853 LONDON GUARANTEE & ACCIDENT CO., LTD., Toronto 853 WARWICK BROS. 856 FETHERSTONHAUGH & CO., Patent So Ucitors, Toronto 856 JONES & BARLOW, Barristers, Toronto 856 THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, Montreal 857 THE GRAND TRUNK SYSTEM, Montreal 858 THE CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY, Toronto 859 ILLUSTRATIONS Fi BLD Masshai. A good many desertions of soldiers were not directly reported and pay- ments continued to be made for a time to undeserving dependants without claim. In Canada, as in England, the Church leaders were not neutral ; nor were they in France or Belgium, Austria or Germany. Almighty God marshalled His army and cleaned Heaven of the undesirables, giving us an example of the kind of peace He wished in His kingdom. If patriotism ineans anything, and I believe that it means much, if that tense feeling that is abroad means anything, it means that every man and every woman quietly and without assertion before God and the world are prepared to go on and on in the battle that will secure the liberty of the world." He did not shrink from Conscription if 340 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW tlie slacker made it necessary; he had "no sympathy at all with the mothers who are hanging on to the coat-tails of their sons, nor with the wives who are clinging to their husbands;" he believed a million men in Canada should rush to meet the King's call and defend the liberties of their race and Empire. 21, containing 12 columns of war news, was described as follows: "In practically every line of it from start to finish, the German, Austrian and Turkish arms are represented as operating successfully." There, also, were several pro-German literary articles — one of which described a trip around the harbour of Ant- werp and expressed joy at the flying of German flags there.

"Besides having sent 40 per cent, of all the enlisted troops from Canada those Provinces would be able to raise all but 0,000 or 0,000 of the amount mentioned." In Alberta, however, where one man in every 27 had enlisted, there would be 4,000 families needing aid. A steady stream of gifts for the sick and wounded has since poured into this country, including a complete Hospital at Taplow, a coach for the Princess Christian Hospital train, 20 motor ambulances for the Front, gifts of money to the British Red Cross of about £15,000 and many thousand packages 326 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW of comforts and clothing, the work of Canadian women. 26) that "personal enquiry made in France indicates situation misrepre- sented. Cannot approve of methods suggested for distribution of supplies." Late in January Lieut.-Col. Sixty-six Red Cross nurses and fifty male attendants had been sent overseas by the Society. Arrests were frequent for aiding enemy aliens to escape across the border; a certain proportion of German missioners, ministers and teachers, who had originally come from the States, were un- doubtedly seditious in an indirect, intangible and yet injurious way; at Luseland, Sask., a Lutheran minister named Stitzer was arrested on Aug.

(3) Where there are several children in a soldier's family, only one may be reckoned at the maximum rate, one at the intermediate, and all others at the minimum rate. Only when these men go into barracks and the subsistence allowance ceases, may their families be helped from the Fund. The contents of these cases are valued at over 0,000. The Winnipeg Telegram said on June 8 that it was quite true that "the German settlements in Western Canada are simply being flooded with journals of this type published in St. Coulter, met certain attacks on the Post Office Department in this respect by a public statement explaining the difficulties of censorship, giving a list of six United States papers prohibited the use of the mails and a large number of pamphlets: "I may say that anything that has been brought to the attention of the Department by the press or from any other source has received immediate consideration.

(2) Families of men on garrison and picket duty in Canada, known as active home service men, must not hereafter be assisted by the Fund. (It is felt that with per month from these three sources such a woman cannot be regarded as being in need.) This ruling does not apply to widowed mothers, nor to married women with children. (7) Families of soldiers who, though they may have enlisted for overseas service, are still living at home and drawing, in addition to their pay, a sub- sistence allowance will receive no help from the Fund. R, Miller described what Montreal had done so far: "We have sent some 15,000 cases of supplies to England, containing chiefly garments and surgical dressings made by the ladies of the Province. One element in this situation, no doubt, was the intlux of German papers from the United States which were bitterly anti-British in tone.

Of the present value of the Work I shall not speak; to gauge its future importance it is only necessary to imagine 15 of these vol- umes published in the years surrounding 1812 or 1867 ! Page The Scott Government; Administration and Politics 651 The Provincial Legislation of the Year 661 The Temperance Legislation of Saskatchewan in 1915 665 Education and School Legislation ; The Bi-lingual Question 673 Saskatchewan and the War ; Agricultural Progress and Conditions 681 THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA IN 1915. Mitchell's Budget 695 Education and Bi-lingualism : The Province and the War 700 Alberta Agriculture, Mining, and Oil Fields; Incidents of the Year 706 THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1915. From all parts of the King's Dominions we have already received generous assistance in our work, but in the increase of British and Overseas Forces at the Front there is a corresponding increase in our expenditure and we shall be truly grateful to you if you will help us by organi2ing an appeal and sending us the proceeds for the objects I have named. 19th said: ''Toronto will lead every city outside Great Britain . The Star opened a Fund in Montreal to which Robert Hampson contributed ,768, James Clark and the Mount Royal Milling Co. Arthur Private was for a time in Canada organizing affairs, placing contribution boxes in banks and post offices, etc., but was recalled in September and replaced by F. In response to a letter from Lord Devonport, Major- Gen. Lessard aided in forming a Canadian Committee which obtained a number of subscriptions. 8th, appealed to the public 330 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW for ,000 "to purchase the necessary equipment and supplies, to supplement the Government issue so as to insure the health and comfort of the N. Many grants were made by local Councils, etc., to local Battalions and this was especially the case, and wisely so, in connection with Recruiting. Ottawa, contributed 4 machine guns, a field kitchen and a set of drums to the 8th C. Miss Arnoldi, head of the Canadian Field Comforts Commission at Shorncliffe, England, appealed for and received many field comforts for soldiers and, in a circular, stated their requirements as follows: Socks, underwear, shirts, small towels, handkerchiefs, leather boot-laces, books, candles, sweets, cocoa, soup tablets, note paper, toilet paper, pencils, games, cards, tobacco, gum, etc. Gooderham referred as follows: While the preparations for that gathering were being made, a great deal of literature bearing on the peace propaganda was circulated in Canada. 333 At the meeting of the Montreal chapters on May 27th Mrs. The good sisters of the various Roman Catholic orders and the church guilds of various Protestant denominations have joined hands in a way that has been most inspiring." The Margaret Poison Murray Chapter in this city was remarkable for the catholicity of its gifts to the troops which included 5,000 cigarettes a month to one Battalion; socks, mufflers and wristlets for another; polo caps, tobacco, pipes, chocolate, candies, chiclets (gum), magazines and soap to another; money to prisoners of war in Germany and towels to the Hospitals. The movement to drill women for Home defence was not so successful and organizations in Toronto and Montreal had an ephemeral existence during the year with a tendency in the public mind to look upon them as zealous but mistaken travesties of a serious subject. 31 : ' * The grim business of enlisting to bear a The Women op Canada and the War: the I. Much was said as to the work of British women in this respect. Mann, writing- as one who knew — and he did not overstate the case — told the Christian Guardian of June 9 that: "It is common knowledge that young women on every hand have given the strongest hints to laggard young nuen that they 'ought to go'; in the majority of British homes the hum of the sewing machine is heard from early mom on, into the evening hours, and the knitting machine and knitting needles, too, are kept busy making Red Cross necessaries and com- forts for those at the Front; when the Government and certain newspapers opened bureaus for the registration of women willing to do special Government or other work if called upon, many thousands responded and throughout the country thousands of women give a number of hours per week in the hospitals tending the sick and wounded soldiers ; it is common knowledge in England to-day that society ladies are now willing, and count it an honour, to wash up dirty mugs for hours on end at hospitals for wounded soldiers; thousands of young women work from early mom till late evening in Governmient factories, and no one has heard of any labour difficulties or strikes among these hard- worked people. As a Church it had, perhaps, stood out more clearly for ideals of Peace than any other great denomina- tion; more vigourously than others against what was usually called Militarism. Our own hearths and homes are appealing to us for protection." At the Toronto Synod (June 11) it was stated that one-sixth of the Brotherhood of St. 14 a meeting of the House of Bishops at Fort William declared that members of the Church "should abstain entirely from the use of alcoholic liquors as a beverage during the War and should refrain absolutely from treating others." In Montreal, Bishop Farthing on Dec. He then asked for leave of absence to go to the Front, and agreed to give up two-thirds of his salary to pay a substitute. In combined form many Ministerial Associa- tions took action throughout Canada which represented all Pro- testant denominations. Here things are getting very dear, and we have to exer- cise economy, as we must do with what we have in our own land. The Alberta Herold of Edmonton continued from time to time to publish offensive articles and opinions, with an English section under the editorship of A. "What will happen to the country of our adop- Condition and Treatment of Aliens in Canada 361 tion if the soul of the people is to le shaken by every European political complication?

It is hardly necessary to say that very much of this data would be lost, irretrievably, without such a record. TABLE OF CONTENTS THE WOELD-WAE IN 1915 Page The Historical and General Environment of the War 17 The War-Position of Germany During 1915 27 The Position in the War of Austria-Hungary; Turkey and the Balkans. 44 German War Methods in Various Countries; Canadian Experiences and Reports 57 France and Belgium in the War During 1915 67 The Position, Policy and War-Action of Bussia during 1915 72 The Entrance and Position of Italy in the World- War 78 Japan and the Neutral States of Europe, Asia and South America. Government, Administration and Politics in Nova Scotia 579 Legislation and Education in Nova Scotia during 1915 585 Nova Scotia and the War: Provincial Development in 1915 589 Government, Administration, and Politics in New Brunswick 598 Legislation of the Tear : Hon. Last Days and Legislation of the Roblin Government 612 The Parliament Buildings ' Issue in Manitoba 619 The New Norris Government: The Perdue Commission 625 Conservative Re-organization and the General Elections 630 General Policy and Action of the Norris Government 634 Education in Manitoba: Agriculture and General Development 642 The Action of Manitoba in the War 649 8 CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW PROVINCIAL AFFAIES IN SASKATCHEWAN. The British Red Cross, with which the Canadian organization was affiliated, came specifically into Canadian affairs only once in the year, though its interests and those of the C. John in view of the great demands upon their resources, both in France and in the Near East, have decided to make an appeal throughout the Empire 328 THE CANADIAN ANNUAL REVIEW by street and other collections upon Oct. The money received from this appeal will be devoted entirely to relieve the sufferings of our wounded sol- diers and sailors from home and overseas at the various seats of war. In Toronto a three days' campaign resulted in a total subscription of 2,668 instead of the expected 0,000 and it realized the hope of J. Woods, the energetic Chairman of Committee, who at a mass-meeting on Oct. This is the first call that has come to us from the Mother Country, the first request Britain has made to us and w^e will respond nobly." Mr. Like that of machine guns it was a concrete reality to the average man or corporation; though it did not attain the same popularity. Similar letters were sent to many important bodies in Canada explaining that the need would last as long as the War and that the Royal Flying Corps could use as many aeroplanes as they could get. A flow of subscriptions was maintained all through the year, in cash and supplies, for the troops at the Front and in this movement cities and towns joined freely. Another British organiza- tion which received some support was the Seamen's Hospital Fund (Greenwich). and men of the Battalion when on the march and in the fighting line." Field Kitchens, involving an expenditure of ,000 were specified. Catharines, Saginaw and Windsor, to a total of ,478,500. Mc Dougald stated that 50,000 articles had gone to the troops from there in a few months including 10,000 hand-knit socks and that "the women of Quebec have, without distinction of race or creed, for the first time worked together under the direction of the Daughters of the Empire. John and other Suffragist societies sent clothing to England for the poor of East London. Women writers in the press did their duty in this respect — the Toronto Telegram having a specially effective and patriotic con- tributor. Belgium has been taught by Roman Catholics to her everlasting credit." What did Methodism, with its 1,079,892 adherents (1911 Census) in Canada do? Meanwhile, individual Methodism had distinguished itself. The Christian Guardian published long lists from week to week of Methodist Ministers' sons who had volunteered for the Front and the total up to Nov. Does not the soul of every free-bom Briton revolt at such a contingency ? The Dean, who in his youth had military experience had joined the British forces at the outbreak of war but was recalled by his Bishop. This can be accomplished only by great and united endeavour. We cannot impress too deeply upon our people the gravity of the situation and the urgent immediate need of every available man enlisting and of our mothers and wives continuing their sacrifice." Other and small denominations took their part in the war- work of the year. 15, 1914) said: "I am much pleased you worked bravely for the poor soldiers. The conduct of Zirzow in the witness-box showed, ab- solutely, that officers trained for the German army have no respect for the civil rights and authorities." During the year a certain amount of veiled friendliness for Germany was expressed by some of the German press of Canada, though it was not overt in character or serious in result. 6, reproduced pro-German speeches from a United States Congress debate without any attempt at explanation or enlargement so as to give both sides. 25, dealt at length with the position of "German-Canadians" and declared that the Government had no business to be spending money in a European war.

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